stands for an active participation of citizens in the economic, social, cultural and political fields of life. In the youth field much emphasis is on learning the necessary competences through voluntary activities. The aim is not only to improve the knowledge, but also motivation, skills and practical experience to be an active citizen.

 

Factors that prevent or restrict youth participation. Barriers can be inidividual, organisation, systemic and policy-related or based on young people’s attitudes or their social position.

The act of bringing different parties (such as decision-makers, experts, young people) working together in order to produce an outcome which is jointly valued.

The act of bringing different parties (such as decision-makers, experts, young people) working together in order to produce an outcome which is jointly valued.

The practice of managing a project, program, process or structure jointly with young people. In a co-management model adults and young people have equal rights and responsibilities. Example of co-management: Council of Europe Advisory Council on Youth.

Bottom three rungs of Roger Hart’s ladder of participation which are classified as non-genuine youth participation practices which do not enable young people to genuinely participate in decision-making processes

Top five rungs of Roger Hart’s ladder of participation with varying degrees of youth involvement. All five rungs are regarded as youth participation

The use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to support participation and involvement in government and governance processes. E-Participation refers to all ICT-supported democratic processes.

A process in which power relationships are changed in the interests of the disadvantaged, oppressed or exploited (e.g. young people, people with disabilities, minorities, women etc)

The idea that everyone, irrespective of age, gender, religion and ethnicity, is entitled to the same rights and/or opportunities. It is a fundamental principle of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights captured in the following: “recognition of the inherent dignity and the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world”. The idea of citizenship embraces equality issues.

Fairness or justice in the way people are treated

An EU-level youth participatroy process implemented across Europe: a dialogue with young people and youth organisations involving policy and decision makers, as well as experts, researchers and other relevant civil society actors. It serves as a forum for continuous joint reflection and consultation on the priorities, implementation and follow-up of European cooperation in the field of youth.

Involves a more structured and usually longer-term approach to involving young people in decision making which is typically executed through formal policies and the creation of youth participatory structures

Frameworks and concepts that underpin and influence youth participation, such as the human rights framework, social justice framework, ethical framework for youth work

A framework comprising of international and domestic legal instruments that protect the fundamental human rights and freedoms of all human beings. Youth participation has its basis in human rights framework and the most notable legal instrument in the area of youth participation is UNCROC.

Society for all, in which every individual has an active role to play. Such a society is based on fundamental values of equity, equality, social justice, and human rights and freedoms, as well as on the principles of tolerance and embracing diversity

Uses mechanisms that have no or a ‘loose’ structure, are ‘casual’ in their tone, require limited planning and resources, are quite often short-term and are usually not executed through formal policy

Refers to all the technical, cognitive, social, civic and creative capacities that allow us to access and have a critical understanding of and interact with media. These capacities allow us to exercise critical thinking, while participating in the economic, social and cultural aspects of society and playing an active role in the democratic process. This concept covers different media: broadcasting, radio, press, through various channels: traditional, internet, social media and addresses the needs of all ages.

Theoretical models conceptualising and explaining the processes or different levels of youth (citizen, or children’s) participation, often presented in a form of diagrams and graphs. A most widely recognised model of youth participation is Roger Hart’s ladder of youth participation.

A range of concrete acts that might be meaningful for young people to carry out in order to influence the political process, or fellow citizens.

The act of giving advantage to those groups in society that are often treated unfairly because of their race, sex, etc

Roger Hart’s ladder of Youth Participation is the most widely used model of youth participation that uses the ladder analogy to provide a typology and distinguish three levels of non-participation and five levels of participation practice.

A flowchart model of youth participation develoepd by Harry Shier that comprises of questions and distinguishes five levels of youth participation. This model builds on the work of Roger Hart’s ladder.

An activity that uses the internet to support political or social causes in a way that does not need much effort, for example by creating or signing online petitions.

A concept that aims at emphasising the importance of social contacts between groups and within groups.

Restriction of access to opportunities and limitation of the capabilities required to capitalise on these opportunities

A society where all its members have the resources, opportunities and capabilities to learn, work, engage and have a voice

Seeks to address disadvantage in the society by focusing on equal access to housing, health and education, equal distribution of economic resources; equality of opportunity for participation and decision-making in society; and equality of rights within a society

An EU-level youth participatroy process implemented across Europe: a dialogue with young people and youth organisations involving policy and decision makers, as well as experts, researchers and other relevant civil society actors. It serves as a forum for continuous joint reflection and consultation on the priorities, implementation and follow-up of European cooperation in the field of youth.

A practice or process where young people appear to be given a voice, but in fact have little or no choice about what they do or how they participate

The most widely ratified international human rights treaty in world’s history, legally binding to most countries in the world, that, amongst other rights, grants all children from 0 to 18 years of age the right to participate in decisions that are being made about them.

The EU youth strategy does not include an official definition of the specific period in life when a person is considered to be ‘young’. The understanding of which age groups are considered to be ‘young people’ varies from one Member State to another, and from one period in time and one socioeconomic context to the other. As an instrument for implementing the EU youth strategy, the Erasmus+ programme targets young people between 13 and 30.

A common name for a youth participatory structure aiming to provide advice to the governing body/management of an organisation, such as local, state or federal government, not-for-profit organisation or corprorate organisation

A common name for a youth participatory structure aiming to represent the views of young people, set up within the structure of another organisation, e.g. Local, state or federal government, not-for-profit organisation or corprorate organisation

An approach that generally views youth participation as a key strategy in enabling the development of skills and competences in young people.

‘Youth engagement’ is a term related to youth participation that has emerged from North America. It is often used interchangeably with ‘youth participation’. US academics Nenga and Taft made an attempt to conceptualize youth engagement as “activities in which children and youth enact a public-spirited commitment in pursuit of the common good” – a kind of balance between volunteerism and activism

Young people’s vision for a Europe that enables young people to realise their full potential that is formulated into 11 specific thematic goals (modelled after Sustainable Development Goals). Youth Goals were formulated as a result of Europe-wide youth consultations with more than 43,000 young people as part of a structured dialogue. They were adopted by youth representatives at an EU Youth Conference in Sofia in 2018 and acknowledged by the EU Council of Ministers as an annex to the EU Youth Strategy.

An approach to participation that that puts less emphasis on change in young people themselves but argues that through participation young people are able to change policy making, organisations and society.

Youth participation in democratic life is about individual young people and groups of young people having the right, the means, the space, the opportunity and, where necessary, the support to freely express their views, contribute to and influence societal decision making on matters affecting them, and be active within the democratic and civic life of our communities.

Structures, such as youth councils, advisory committees, student representative councils etc, with the purpose of enabling youth participation