A manual for combating hate speech online through human rights education

Year of production: 2020

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Hate Speech Movement, the Council of Europe’s youth Campaign against hate speech online, and will be useful for educators working to address this problem, both inside and outside the formal education system. The manual is designed for working with young people aged 13 to 18; however, activities can be adapted to other age ranges and other profiles of learners. \nThe activities in the manual should help young people in developing the knowledge, skills and attitudes which will be needed if the Internet is to reflect the fundamental principles which have been established for the real world.\nLike the youth Campaign, this manual sees hate speech as a human rights concern and the approach used in the activities is based on human rights principles and standards. This makes the manual useful not only in addressing online hate speech but also as a way of understanding human rights themselves and the way they apply both in offline as well as online settings. "}" data-sheets-userformat="{"2":13185,"3":{"1":0},"10":2,"11":0,"12":0,"15":"arial, sans, sans-serif","16":9}">This manual has been designed to support the No Hate Speech Movement, the Council of Europe’s youth Campaign against hate speech online, and will be useful for educators working to address this problem, both inside and outside the formal education system. The manual is designed for working with young people aged 13 to 18; however, activities can be adapted to other age ranges and other profiles of learners.
The activities in the manual should help young people in developing the knowledge, skills and attitudes which will be needed if the Internet is to reflect the fundamental principles which have been established for the real world.
Like the youth Campaign, this manual sees hate speech as a human rights concern and the approach used in the activities is based on human rights principles and standards. This makes the manual useful not only in addressing online hate speech but also as a way of understanding human rights themselves and the way they apply both in offline as well as online settings.

Authors

Council of Europe (CoE)

The Council of Europe is the continent's leading human rights organisation. It includes 47 member states, 27 of which are members of the European Union. The Council of Europe advocates freedom of expression and of the media, freedom of assembly, equality, and the protection of minorities. The Council of Europe helps member states fight corruption and terrorism and undertake necessary judicial reforms. The Council of Europe promotes human rights through international conventions, such as the Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women and Domestic Violence and the Convention on Cybercrime.