Accessibility

The Wayback Machine

Image is illustrative. By Taylor Vick on Unsplash.

The Wayback Machine has been archiving web history since 1996, back when the Internet was still an emerging medium in mainstream use. The site has more than 330 billion web pages, 20 million books and texts, 4.5 million audio recordings (including 180,000 live concerts), 4 million videos (including 1.6 million Television News programs), 3 million images and 200,000 software programs. On top of that, anyone with a free account can upload media, which means when a trusted citation might be needed in the future, one can just capture a web page as it appears now. A great tool for research and a good tool for teaching the vast amount of data and how everything you post online is stored somewhere, in some form or other.

Authors

The Internet Archive

The Internet Archive, a 501(c)(3) non-profit, is building a digital library of Internet sites and other cultural artifacts in digital form. Like a paper library, it provides free access to researchers, historians, scholars, the print disabled, and the general public. Started archiving the Internet itself in since 1996, the Internet Archive has 20+ years of web history accessible through the Wayback Machine works with 625+ library and other partners through Archive-It program to identify important web pages. In 2020 the Internet Archive provides digital versions of 330 billion web pages, 20 million books and texts, 4.5 million audio recordings (including 180,000 live concerts), 4 million videos (including 1.6 million Television News programs), 3 million images, and 200,000 software programs.